Josef “Jeff” Sipek

Generating Random Data

Over the years, there have been occasions when I needed to generate random data to feed into whatever system. At times, simply using /dev/random or /dev/urandom was sufficient. At other times, I needed to generate random data at a rate that exceeded what I could get out of /dev/random. This morning, I read Chris’s blog entry about his need for generating lots of random data. I decided that I should write my favorite approach so that others can benefit.

The approach is very simple. There are two phases. First, we set up our own random pool. Second we use the random pool. I am going to use an example throughout the rest of this post. Suppose that we want to make repeated 128 kB writes to a block device and we want the data to be random so that the device can’t do anything clever (e.g., compress or dedup). Say that during this benchmark we want to write out 64 GB total. (In other words, we will issue 524288 writes.)

Setup Phase

During the setup phase, we create a pool of random data. The easiest way is to just read /dev/urandom. Here, we want to read enough data so that the pool is large enough. For our 128kB write example, we’d want at least 1 MB. (I’ll explain the sizing later. I would probably go with something like 8 MB because unless I’m on some sort of limited system, the extra 7 MB of RAM won’t be missed.)

“Using the Pool” Phase

Now that we have the pool, we can use it to generate random buffers. The basic idea is to pick a random offset into the pool and just grab the bytes starting at that location. In our example, we’d pick a random offset between zero and pool size minus 128 kB, and use the 128 kB at that offset.

In pseudo code:

#define BUF_SIZE	(128 * 1024)
#define POOL_SIZE	(1024 * 1024)

static char pool[POOL_SIZE];

char *generate()
{
	return &pool[rand() % (POOL_SIZE - BUF_SIZE)];
}

That’s it! You can of course make it more general and let the caller tell you how many bytes they want:

#define POOL_SIZE	(1024 * 1024)

static char pool[POOL_SIZE];

char *generate(size_t len)
{
	return &pool[rand() % (POOL_SIZE - len)];
}

It takes a pretty simple argument to show that even a modest sized pool will be able to generate lots of different random buffers. Let’s say we’re dealing with the 128 kB buffer and 1 MB pool case. The pool can return 128 kB starting at offset 0, or offset 1, or offset 2, … or offset 9175043 ($1~MB - 128~kB - 1B$). This means that there are 917504 possible outputs. Recall, that in our example we were planning on writing out 64 GB in total which was 524288 writes.

$\frac{524288}{917504} = 0.571$

In other words, we are planning on using less than 58% of the possible outputs from our 1 MB pool to write out 64 GB of random data! (An 8 MB pool would yield 6.3% usage.)

If the length is variable, the math gets more complicated, but in a way we get even better results (i.e., lower usage) because to generate the same buffer we would need have the same offset and length. If the caller supplies random (pseudo-random or based on some distribution) lengths, we’re very unlikely to get the same buffer out of the pool.

Observations

Some of you may have noticed that we traded generating 128 kB (or a user supplied length) of random data for generating a random integer. There are two options there, either you can use a fast pseudo-random number generator (like the Wikipedia article: Mersenne twister), or you can reuse same pool! In other words:

#define POOL_SIZE	(1024 * 1024)

static char pool[POOL_SIZE];
static size_t *ridx = (size_t *) pool;

char *generate(size_t len)
{
	if ((uintptr_t) ridx == (uintptr_t) &pool[POOL_SIZE])
		ridx = (size_t *) pool;

	ridx++;

	return &pool[*ridx % (POOL_SIZE - len)];
}

I leave it as an exercise for the reader to either make it multi-thread safe, or to make the index passed in similarly to how rand_r takes an argument.

rand_r Considered Harmful

Since we’re on the topic of random number generation, I thought I’d mention what is already rather widely known fact — libc’s rand and rand_r implementations are terrible. At one point, I tried using them with this approach to generate random buffers, but it didn’t take very long before I got repeats! Caveat emptor.

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